Morphing Manhattan

Author:  Amy Horn
All photos copyrighted Amy Horn Designs

Whether it is going to museums or art websites, I learn more about light and creativity through the art and photographs I study. I have found installing a new app on my iPhone or iPad sparks my creative juices as well. For instance, on a recent family trip to New York City, I installed a new app to my phone: Rollworld. This app creates tiny planets, rabbit holes or morphing videos from the in app camera or using images from your camera roll. Let me explain.

•    A tiny planet is when the two ends of the photograph are stretched in a circular manner to meet so the sky Rollworldbecomes the outer edges of this circular photo.
•    A rabbit hole does the exact opposite. The sky becomes the center of the photo.
•    Morphing video is a moving picture that takes the photo from point A to point B. Any photos you create whether it it s a tiny planet or a rabbit hole (or both) can then turn into a morphing video as it transitions from one state to another.

The Rollworld app offers many customizing functions to invert, balance, spin, smooth transitions, zoom, scroll, and offers a randomizing effect. Shake the phone or push the button and you will see a new creation each time. Creations are limitless. When you find something you love, export it to several social media sites or to your camera roll and choose the resolution (up to 3000 x 3000 pixels).

What I learned when using Rollworld app. I found images with a fair amount of sky or water worked well. With my long flight home, I created several versions of an image to see what I liked best and found that to be very entertaining as well. If you are looking for a fun app to show your creative side download Rollworld for free. There is an in app purchase if you would like to export the videos. But all image processing is free!

If you are interested in more iPhone/iPad tips and tricks, sign up for her iPhone and/or iPad course through Arizona Highways Photo Workshops at ahpw.org. You can also follow her at horndesigns.com.

iPad on the Run

by Amy Horn

I love my iPad. There may be some tablets that do these same tasks, but I began on an iPad and it is what I know. Last Saturday, my son was running in a track meet in Phoenix and since I love photographing sports, I contacted our Flagstaff newspaper to see if they had anyone covering the meet. With such a tight budget, journalists are rarely sent out of town. So, I was told I could send in photos and with the coach’s report of highlights of the day, they would try to publish something. Track meets are long. So, after 7 hours of shooting and 300 action photos of the athletes, I talked to coach and reviewed the results of the day. It was time to select the photos for the newspaper. This is when I began my iPad workflow.

I downloaded the images to my iPad using the camera connector kit and then began sorting. I found six images that included the top performers of the day and tagged them in the photos app (application) as “favorites.” After minimal editing (exposure and cropping), I created a new folder with these images in my Dropbox app. I was ready to email my contact at the Daily Sun. A slight setback occurred when I realized I was out of wifi range. My iPad is a wifi only iPad, so from the outdoor bleachers at the track meet I set my phone to create a hotspot and connected my iPad. Through the Dropbox app I created a link to share my new folder and copy/pasted it into the email along with details about the athletes and photos. Then, I hit send. A few days later, the AZ Daily Sun included one of the photos with their story and I never left the track meet.

If you would like to learn more about using an iPad in a photography workflow, sign up for my workshop on June 20, 2015 here.